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Great & Horrible News, by Blessin Adams

Great & Horrible News, by Blessin Adams

Brutal, bloody killings are enacted in all their heart-stopping, gory glory in this compulsively readable title.

As a former policewoman, Blessin Adams is well aware of the human cost of murder. In Great and Horrible News, this moving nonfiction study, she investigates the crimes that shook Tudor and Stuart England. In doing so, she approaches her cases forensically: and what a...

The Slipperiness of History

The Slipperiness of History

The author of a trilogy of Renaissance set novels describes her heroine, the creator of a mysterious potion. Or was she?

The Slipperiness of History I was really interested to read recently that the coded letters of Mary Queen of Scots have been deciphered by modern computer scientists and decoders. Undoubtedly this will give us hitherto unknown insights into what we know about her and...

A Divided Kingdom: Robert Harris on Act of Oblivion

A Divided Kingdom: Robert Harris on Act of Oblivion

Our editor met Robert Harris to talk about his latest novel set in the aftermath of the fall of Cromwell.
Oliver Webb-Carter

In preparation for my meeting with Robert Harris (of course I’d read his latest novel, Act of Oblivion), I read a number of interviews and listened to his Desert Island Discs with Kirsty Young. 12 years old now, it is a fascinating and enlightening episode, and gave...

Henrietta Maria, by Leanda de Lisle

Henrietta Maria, by Leanda de Lisle

Superb and beautifully written.

Leanda de Lisle’s biography of Henrietta Maria has burnt through the mist of four hundred years of propaganda. It pitches Henrietta at her own level. She is brought down from pious pedestals and raised up from the mire in which her reputation has often lain. With this...

The Winter Garden, by Nicola Cornick

The Winter Garden, by Nicola Cornick

The Winter Garden is the latest story from the bestselling historical novelist.
Ella Beales

The Winter Garden is a historical fiction time-slip novel, exploring the Gunpowder Plot as it has never been done before. Unravelling the myths, legends and stories we know about the events of 1605, Nicola Cornick brings to life the people behind our modern-day...

Robert Catesby & The Gunpowder Plot

Robert Catesby & The Gunpowder Plot

Robert Catesby who was the driving force behind the terrorist plot to kill King James I, along with hundreds of others in the Gunpowder Plot.

Would ‘penny for the Robert’ have quite the same ring to it? Probably not, but as Nicola Cornick demonstrates, it was Robert Catesby who was the driving force behind the terrorist plot to kill King James I, along with hundreds of others in the Gunpowder Plot. As a...

AoH Book Club: Paul Lay on Providence Lost

AoH Book Club: Paul Lay on Providence Lost

When Providence Lost was first published in January 2020, the 17th century had not received a huge amount of attention, and Oliver Cromwell’s reputation was not even up for debate. That’s not the case today.

Paul Lay, your book Providence Lost: The Rise and Fall of Cromwell's Protectorate. This has been an in vogue subject of the last few years, really, this period of the 17th century, the Civil Wars and then the Interregnum. Oliver Cromwell played rather a sort of...

Royal Yachts Under Sail, by Brian Lavery

Royal Yachts Under Sail, by Brian Lavery

An illustrated history of royal yachts which began in the reign of Charles II.
David Boyle

Royal yachts - like the word yacht in English - haven’t been with us forever. They both began during the English Civil War, and it was only when Charles II took to the sea himself - and loved it - that the whole business of royal yachts began. The first one was...

History Festivals: Why Buckingham Matters

History Festivals: Why Buckingham Matters

Scintillating conversation, and of course a bar. The director argues the case for Buckingham

The Buckingham History Festival, which takes place in the celebrated market town over the weekend of 15-17 September, is one that subscribers to Aspects of History will relish. There’s a particular emphasis this year on the Early Modern period – which is no surprise...

Who Were the Huguenots?

Who Were the Huguenots?

The Huguenots, many of whom were expelled from France, enriched the countries they migrated to.
Rosemary Hayes

It is estimated that one in six people in England have Huguenot ancestry.  Yet the Huguenots (Protestants who were largely artisans and professionals) integrated so seamlessly into their adopted countries that, generations on, it is easy to forget the circumstances...